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Standard EICR

Electrical Installation Condition Report

  • 4 hr
  • From 22 British pounds
  • Customer's Place

Service Description

Commonly Referred to as a Landlords Certificate or Fixed Wire Testing it's easy to understand why the electrical industry can be confusing. This service is to carry out a Standard EICR and includes the following: • Up to 10 circuits • NICEIC certification • Free consultation • Free quotation for any repair work required. If you're unsure how many circuits you have in your property please send us a photo of your consumer unit (Also known as your Fuse Board), either by email to info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk or by What's App on the link on our home page. A member of our team will be happy to help.


Cancellation Policy

There is no charge for cancellation if we have received more than 10 working days' notice prior to your booking slot. For cancellations received with less than 10 working days' notice will be charged at 50% of the order value. Bookings cancelled with less than 48 hours' notice are non refundable.


Contact Details

0114 242 2939

info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk

M Howe Electrical Services Ltd, Parkway Avenue, Sheffield, UK


  • Why Choose M Howe Electrical Services?
    We offer a first-class service from start to finish. Check out our 5 Star reviews on Google, Checkatrade and Yell. When you buy a service or product from us, we really care about your custom and pride ourselves on making sure your customer journey is simple, clear, and well communicated from start to finish. Using our in-house fully trained engineers and network of sub-contractors we also offer unrivalled support 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, so you won’t get left stranded when you choose our most comprehensive Priority 24 Support Package.
  • Do I need to do anything to prepare?
    Depending on where some of the items are located in your home, you might need to make some space to be able to access the area.
  • Location 1 : 0-15 miles
    S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S13, S14, S17, S74, S40, S41, S43, S49, S18, S32, S60, S61, S62, S63, S64, S65, S66, DN12
  • Location 2 : 15-30 miles
    S71, S72, S73, S75, S42, S44, S45, S33, S80, S81, DN1, DN2, DN3, DN4, DN5, DN6, DN7, DN9, DN10, DN11, NG22, NG18, NG19, NG20, NG21, DE4, DE45, SK17, HD8, WF5, WF1, WF2, WF4
  • Our Standard Installation Criteria
    Existing Installation The existing light pull switch to be replaced must already be functional and fault finding is not required. See our Full Terms & Conditions to find out more. Online Survey Form You must have completed the online survey form and the information submitted must be accurate and complete. (Please select our standard response service if fault finding is required) The existing installation meets current wiring regulations. The Ceiling Height is not more than 3mtrs from the floor level.
  • What if my installation doesn’t meet Std criteria?
    Don’t worry if your installation does not meet our standard installation criteria. We may need to carry out a site survey. Our in-house engineer will visit your property to look at installation feasibility and key areas relating to your installation including the incoming service pipework, the consumer unit and the light pull switch you require replacing. This is completely free of charge in Locations 1 & 2. If your outside of these locations, there will be a cost of £60 and is subject to availability.
  • What areas of my home will you ask to see?
    Here’s a list of the items/areas we’ll ask to view during your site survey. Electric meter and surrounding area Usually located in a white cabinet on an outside wall of your home Or, inside, perhaps near your front door or under the stairs Water Supply We’ll ask you to locate your water stop tap, which is usually located under the kitchen sink or near your boiler. We’re looking to see whether this supply is bonded. Heating Supply Most homes have a gas supply, so we’ll ask you to show us your gas meter. Or, if you have an oil supply or anything else, we’ll ask to view it.
  • Do I need to do anything to prepare?
    Depending on where some of the items (listed above) are located in your home, you might need to make some space to be able to access this area. If your electric meter is in a locked cupboard, you’ll need the key.
  • Choose the Easee One!
    The Easee One works as both a tethered and untethered charger, so you can decide to leave the cable locked into the charger or store it in your boot. (Cable sold separately). Beautifully compact The Easee One is one of the best-looking and most versatile EV chargers available today, while also managing to remain impressively small and discreet. Dimensions - H256 x W193 x D106mm Universal charging Thanks to the Easee One's smart design and app, you no longer need to choose between tethered or untethered EV chargers - the Easee does both! Prefer a tethered charger (cable permanently attached)? No problem, simply plug the cable into the Easee One and lock the cable in via the Easee app. If you want the flexibility of an untethered unit (no cable attached), then just remove the cable, and plug it in at your own leisure. This also means the Easee One will work with any EV out of the box. Easee 7.5m branded cable sold separately (£239). Other branded cables are also available from our accessories store. WiFi and Mobile Data Easee One connects to the internet through its in-built WiFi connection. This enables over-the-air updates to add new features and make improvements over time. It also includes a 4G mobile connection for improved internet connectivity and reliability. Choice of colours The Easee One is available with three colour options as standard: Black, White, and Anthracite Grey You can purchase other faceplate colours, such as Blue or Red for £35.00 from our accessories store. These faceplates are easily swapped with no professional help. 7kW power output The Easee One is capable of charging your vehicle at up to 7kW, which will provide around 30 miles of range per hour depending on your vehicle. Cable security You can permanently lock your cable into the Easee, removing the fear that someone might remove it. An Easee branded cable can be bought separately for (£239), or you can buy different branded 5m and 10m cables from our accessories page. Built-in earthing protection Some charge points require the installation of a copper earth rod, or alternative device, at your property for safety reasons. But this can also add complexity and extra cost to the job. The Easee One avoids the need for this thanks to its built-in PEN fault detection feature. Future proofed Easee One can be easily expanded as your EV household grows by "daisy-chaining" up to three chargers. The Easee One will share power evenly between up to three units on the same circuit, so your EVs get their fair share of charge. Cyber Security compliant The Easee One meets the latest standard in EV charger cyber security regulations, which came into force on 31st December 2022. It means that the Easee One has anti-tamper detection and all-round better data security. Learn more about the regulations in our EV charger cyber security guide. Full Control – Home or away The Easee app gives you access to a range of smart features including charge scheduling. Plan your charging Charge your EV on your terms. Simply plug in and charge straight away or set up a schedule so your vehicle charges at specific times - for example, when your electricity prices are lower. Real-time monitoring See the charge status of your car, monitor your energy consumption and more. Remote lock/unlock Concerned about charger security? Don't be - the Easee app lets you remotely "lock" the charger to prevent unwanted use. Cable lock/unlock If you want to set up your Easee One as a "tethered" device and keep the cable (sold separately) in place, you can lock it in place using the Easee app. Alternatively, unlock the cable to store it in your car boot or home. Over-the-air updates The Easee app is regularly updated with improvements and new features, so your Easee product gets better and better over time.
  • Can I get a Type 1 version of the Easee One?
    No, but the Easee One has a universal socket which will work with a Type 1 cable and therefore a Type 1 electric vehicle. This is because the Easee can operate as both a tethered (cable attached) or untethered (socket only) charge point. If you have a Type 1 vehicle, simply order a Type 1 EV charging cable, and plug it into the Easee and your vehicle.
  • Can I get a longer cable for the Easee One?
    The Easee One does not come with a cable as standard. You can order a Type 2 Easee branded cable (7.5m) separately for £239. Type 1 cables are unfortunately not available. Or you can order EV charging cables from our accessories shop which you can still use with your Easee unit. You can order Type 2 EV charging cables directly our accessories shop, including a longer 10-metre cable.
  • Is there a 22kW version of the Easee One?
    Yes. If you have a three-phase electricity supply at home, then a charger that offers a charging rate of up to 22kW could be a great option for you. The Easee Charge is identical to the Easee One in every way except it is also capable of 22kW three-phase charging for a faster EV charge.
  • Is the Easee One “weather-proof”?
    Yes. It has IP54 certification, plus 11 sensors and intelligent temperature measurement to keep you and your home safe. It is also designed and built in Norway, so the Easee should be able to cope with the good-old British weather.
  • Can I get the Easee One in different colours?
    Yes. The Easee One come delivered with a black faceplate as standard, but you can order different colours separately. Plus, the faceplate is easily changed so you won't need an electrician to do this. Available colours include white, black, grey, red, and blue. These can be purchased separately for £35.00.
  • What is the warranty for the Easee One?
    There is a three-year warranty on the Easee One supplied by Easee. Any issues under warranty should be dealt with by Easee direct unless you are an MHE Support customer.
  • Our Standard Installation Criteria
    Cable Route (We’ll surface run up to 15 metres of cable) Parking (The property must have private off-street parking) Wall Penetration (We will penetrate up to 3 internal walls) Chargepoint Fixing (The Chargepoint must be fixed permanently to an external wall) Groundworks (The installation must not have any groundworks) Completed Online Survey Form (To Skip This Please Book a standard site survey) See our Full Terms & Conditions to find out more.
  • What if my installation doesn’t meet the standard
    Don’t worry if your installation does not meet our standard installation criteria. We may need to carry out a site survey. Our in-house engineer will visit your property to look at installation feasibility and key areas relating to your installation including incoming supply, the best cable route, and the charge point location. This is completely free of charge in Locations 1 & 2. If your outside of these locations, there will be a cost of £60 and is subject to availability.
  • More Than 10 Circuits or Your Unsure How Many You
    Each of the above options is based on one Distribution Board and up to 10 Circuits however don’t worry if you have more in your property or are unsure how many you have. Choose one of two bolt on options above if you have more than 10 Circuits. Please keep reading to find out more. Distribution Boards (Otherwise known as consumer units or fuse boards) come in various shapes and sizes but you can expect them to look something like the picture below. Distribution boards are made up of miniature circuit breakers (MCB’s). Counting these will tell you the number of circuits present at your home or business. They may be all in a single board or several boards in different locations. Please Note. You do not need to count the separate residual current device (RCD) switches or the red double-width main switches in this. On some boards, there will be triple width breakers known as 3-phase breakers. These also need to be included in your count, as 3-phase circuits. Still Unsure? If your still unsure, contact us on our Live Chat feature on our website, or give us a call on 0114 242 2939. You can even send us a message on Whatsapp 07769675753 or send us an email: info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk
  • What’s The Difference Between the Three Options?
    Essentially the main difference between the three options we offer is the thoroughness of the visual inspection of accessories. (Sockets, Switches, Light Fittings etc…). As a minimum our engineers will visually inspect 10% of your installation however this Basic option is usually reserved for installations we have previously inspected and tested in the past or for properties our engineers visit on a regular basis. The Standard Option is our most popular choice which also comes with a Free Re-Test and Re-Issue of certification following repair works we may have carried out on the back of a previous inspection and test. For complete peace of mind our most comprehensive inspection and test, The Pro option also comes with the Re-Labelling of your consumer unit (if required) and benefits from a free re-test and re-issue of certification.
  • How Often Should I Have This?
    Are you a homeowner? Did you know that it is recommended that your electrics are tested once every 10 years? For Landlords it’s recommended every 5 years or change of occupancy. Here at M Howe Electrical Services, safety checks are a speciality of ours. Please see the below for some more information designed to explain more about them and why you should choose us to carry this out for you.
  • Why Should I Get an Electrical Safety Check?
    In the same way that you get an MOT for your car, or your boiler serviced, it’s important to remember to get your electrics checked. For homeowners or Landlords, these tests determine the safety and condition of the wiring within your home or rented accommodation. As well as the 10-year rule, if you find your home is showing signs of wear and tear you should consider having an electrical test. These signs might include burning smells, sparking, flickering lights or irregularities with sockets. If this is the case, you should have the test carried out urgently. Perhaps you own a business or you’re a landlord, subsequently you have a legal obligation to have your electrics maintained. Therefore, if you fail to comply, insurance companies could use this as a reason to refute any claims. In 2020, the legal requirements changed therefore landlords must get a new electrical safety report every 5 years or sooner if recommended. It’s essential to stay safe when using electricity and safety checks are very important.
  • Preparing For the Visit
    If you decide to get the safety test carried out, there are a few ways you can help by preparing before an electrician arrives. Your electrician needs to turn the power off before working on the wiring. Therefore, you won’t be able to use any electrical gadgets whilst the work takes place. Consequently, if you work from home, it’s probably better to go out for a while and work somewhere else if you can. Your electrician needs access to all lights, sockets, and light switches, along with the consumer unit or fuse board. Therefore, please clear the areas where they will need to work before, they arrive. If you have a prepayment electric meter, you must ensure there is enough credit on it for a safety check to be completed. Unplug as many appliances as possible including your TV and Fridge. Remember, it is your responsibility to plug them back in after the electrics have been tested.
  • How Long Will It Take?
    An electrical safety check takes between 3-4 hours to complete. Nevertheless, this depends on the size of the property and the number of circuits that need testing. It’s worth noting that if you own a business it is your responsibility to ensure that the electrical system is constructed in such a way that prevents danger. Equally important is to ensure that the electrical systems are maintained. This includes a fixed inspection every 5 years. Failure to comply could lead to prosecution or a fine. Subsequently, it is in your interest to get a safety check complete which only takes between 3-4 Hours.
  • What Will the Check Tell Me?
    The electrician working on your safety test produces a report known as the electrical installation condition report or EICR. This report identifies any damage, deterioration, defects, or conditions which may be dangerous. It determines if the electrics comply with the current British Standard for electrical safety. Finally, it will also include recommendations for improvements. The purpose of a report is to determine whether the installation is safe to continue using. An electrician checks the wiring, the fuse board, earth bonding and all the other parts that you can’t see. It’s not just about whether your lights come on or not.
  • Electrical Safety Check Certificate
    Once the EICR is complete, we provide you with a certificate outlining the overall condition of the electrical installation. Homeowners, for example, may request a condition report as part of a house sale. It’s always worthwhile having a check done if you are moving into a new home, to see if any work needs to be done. Landlords need to get homes regularly tested to comply with the law. The EICR information is a more detailed report than a visual check which we will look at next.
  • Visual Inspection
    To begin with, your electrician will visit your property to make a visual inspection. They will then carry out a series of checks on your electrical systems. If a switch or socket is found to be an immediate danger, that’s a ‘code one’ problem. The electrician must fix it there and then or at least make it safe before leaving. ‘Code two’ problems are potentially dangerous, and ‘code three’ problems are recommendations for improvements to appliances deemed unsafe. Essentially, you will know about any dangerous electrics on the very first visit.
  • How You Can Make Your Electrics Safer
    Moreover, there are many things you can do to make your home or business safer. These include: Making sure any bulbs are the correct wattage for the fitting on lamps or lights. Ensuring any portable heaters are stable and at least 90cm away from curtains and other combustible materials. Checking the leads on your kettle, iron, and other portable appliances to make sure they haven’t frayed. Here at M Howe Electrical Services, we can also carry out Portable Appliance Testing. Checking that only the outer sheath of cables is showing on plugs. Wherever possible, unplugging appliances if not in use or turning lights and appliances off. This saves wear and tear of your equipment. Making sure that appliance leads do not come into contact with hot or wet surfaces at any time.
  • What Happens Next?
    Once you have placed your order with us either online or over the phone, we will give you a fixed time slot for the inspection to be carried out. This is usually a 4 Hour slot however some larger properties/Installations may take longer. Upon completion of the test and inspection our engineers will complete the certification using online software. They will also complete a quotation form for any observations noted enabling us to provide you with a fixed price quotation to bring your installation into a satisfactory condition. Please allow up to 5 Working Days from the completion of your inspection for our engineer and qualified NICEIC supervisor to complete your certification and subsequent quotation should there be any observations found.
  • What is Emergency Lighting?
    Emergency lighting is lighting for an emergency situation when the main power supply is cut, and normal electrical illumination fails. The loss of mains electricity could be the result of a fire or a power cut. Without emergency lighting this could lead to sudden darkness and possible danger to occupants, either through physical danger or panic. Emergency lighting is normally required to operate fully automatically and give illumination of a sufficiently high level to enable all occupants to evacuate the premises safely. Most new buildings have emergency lighting installed during construction; the design and type of equipment being specified by the architect in accordance with current Building Regulations and any local authority requirements. The British Standard provides the emergency lighting designer with clear guidelines to work to. BS 5266-1 relates not only to hotels, clubs, hospitals, nursing homes, schools and colleges, licensed premises, offices, museums, shops but also multi-storey dwellings. Although the standard recommends the types and backup durations for each category of premises, it should be remembered that standards define a minimum requirement and that a higher specification may be required for a particular application. Emergency Lighting automatically comes on when the power supply to the normal lighting provision fails. Emergency lighting is a general term and is sub-divided into emergency escape lighting and standby lighting. Emergency escape lighting – that part of an emergency lighting system that provides illumination for the safety of people leaving a location or attempting to terminate a potentially dangerous process beforehand. It is part of the fire safety provision of a building and a requirement of The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. Standby lighting– that part of an emergency lighting system provided to enable normal activities to continue substantially unchanged. This guide does not include standby lighting as it is not a legal requirement and is a facility that may or may not be needed, depending on the use and occupancy of the premises. Emergency escape lighting is itself sub-divided into escape route lighting, open area lighting and high-risk task area lighting. Escape route lighting – identifies the escape route and keeps it sufficiently lit. This includes illuminated fire exit signs but also emergency lighting such as emergency lighting bulkheads. Emergency Exit Light Open area lighting (in some countries known as anti-panic lighting) – ensures that there is sufficient illumination to allow the occupants of a building to reach a place where an escape route can be identified. Bulkhead emergency lighting High risk task area lighting – that part of an emergency escape lighting system that provides illumination for the safety of people involved in a potentially dangerous process or situation and to enable proper shut-down procedures for the safety of the operator and other occupants of the premises. Consultation and design The first stage of installing emergency escape lighting is consultation and design. The designer, responsible person and fire risk assessor should meet and decide where the escape lighting is required and mark up a plan showing the areas to be covered, the type (power supply), mode of operation, facilities, and duration of emergency lighting to be provided in an emergency. Type (power supply) Self-Contained – Single Point Advantages: The installation is faster and cheaper. Standard wiring material may be used. Failure of mains supply due to cable burn-through will automatically trigger the affected emergency luminaire to come on. Low maintenance costs – periodic test and general cleaning, only, required. Low hardware equipment costs – no requirement for extended wiring, special ventilation etc The integrity of the system is greater because each luminaire is independent of the others. System can easily be extended with additional luminaires. No special sub-circuit monitoring requirements Disadvantages: The environmental conditions will vary throughout the system and batteries may be adversely affected by a relatively high or low ambient temperature. Battery life is limited to between 2 and 4 years, dependent upon the application. Testing requires isolation and observation of luminaires on an individual basis. In general, the decision to use either a central battery or a self-contained system is likely to be cost-determined. If an installation has longevity and low maintenance as priorities, then the higher initial cost of a central battery system may be acceptable for a large project. Typically, luminaire and installation costs are a major consideration, particularly on smaller jobs, and it is this criterion which makes the self-contained luminaire the most popular choice.
  • Emergency lighting classifications
    The old NM or M classification with duration in hours has been replaced with a code consisting of letter/number/letter/number, as follows: 1) Type X – self-contained Y – central battery 2) Mode of operation 0 non-maintained 1 maintained 2 combined non-maintained 3 combined maintained further modes are also described. 3) Facilities A including test device B including remote test device C including inhibiting mode D high risk task luminaire 4) Duration in minutes. 10, 60,120 or 180 The classification is expressed as per the following example: [x][0][***][180] – Self-contained, Non-maintained, ***, 3 hours duration. *** This is added as applicable at the time of installation.
  • Siting of luminaires and emergency signs
    Having decided on your basic system, consideration should now be given to the siting of the emergency lighting units and signs within the particular premises involved. This will then form the basis on which your selection of equipment can be made. M Howe Electrical Services provides a graphical guide for the location of emergency lights. Lighting units and signs should be sited so as to clearly show the exit routes leading to the final exits from the premises. Where the exit route or final exit is not readily identifiable, a sign should be utilised rather than a lighting unit. Particular attention should be paid to individual stairways, changes in floor level, corridor intersections, changes in direction, the outside of each final exit, control / plant rooms, lifts, toilet areas over 8m2 (although there is an argument for providing all toilets with public access, and especially those for the disabled, with emergency lighting). Access to fire alarm call points and firefighting equipment should be clearly illuminated. It is not necessary to provide individual lights (luminaires) for each item above, but there should be a sufficient overall level of light to allow them to be visible and usable. N.B: detailed computer point calculations or luminaire manufacturers’ spacing tables should be used. The above is a brief summary and we recommend that the appropriate standard is studied to gain a full understanding of what is involved.
  • How much light?
    BS 5266 recommends the provision of horizontal illumination at floor level along the centre line of a defined escape route (permanently unobstructed) not less than 1 lux, and 0.5 lux for anti-panic areas, to exclude a 0.5m border around the route. In addition, for escape routes of up to 2m wide, 50% of the route width should be lit to a minimum of 1 lux. Wider escape routes can be treated as a number of 2m wide bands. The actual degree of illumination should be closely related to the nature of both the premises and its occupants, with special consideration being given to care homes for the elderly, hospitals, crowded venues such as pubs, nightclubs and supermarkets, and to whether or not the premises have overnight accommodation, e.g. hotels. The level of illumination in certain rooms and areas within a building will vary depending on their use; all this information is contained in the appendices to BS 5266-1. N.B: The above is a brief summary and we recommend that the appropriate standard is studied to gain a full understanding of what is involved.
  • Commissioning Certificate and Logbook
    BS 5266 requires written declarations of compliance to be available on site for inspection. These should detail the quality of the installation and its conformance to IEE regulations, including the main circuit of the normal lighting system feeding non-maintained fittings. Photometric performance is required and evidence of compliance with light levels has to be supplied by the system designer. On completion of the installation of the emergency lighting system, or part thereof, a completion certificate should be supplied by the installer to the occupier / owner of the premises. A declaration of satisfactory test of operation is necessary and a log of all system tests and results must be maintained. System logbooks, with commissioning forms, testing forms and instructions, should be provided by the installer. Maintenance Finally, to ensure that the system remains fully operational, essential servicing should be specified. This would usually be performed as part of the testing routine, but in the case of consumable items such as replacement lamps, spares should be provided for immediate use. Servicing and testing To test an emergency lighting system, a mains power failure on the normal lighting circuit / circuits or individual luminaries must be simulated. This will force the emergency lighting system to operate via the battery supply. This test can be carried out manually or automatically. Manual testing A simulated mains failure can be achieved by providing a switch to isolate all lighting circuits / individual circuits / individual luminaires. If manual testing is utilised, the following points should be considered: In a system with a single switch for the whole building or a large circuit, after simulating the mains failure it is necessary for the tester to walk the whole building or circuit, to check all emergency luminaire are operating correctly. After restoring the mains supply, the whole building or circuit must be walked again, to check that the emergency lights are recharging. If the emergency luminaires are individually switched, only a single walk around the building will be needed. However, the test switches could spoil the decor of the building and they must be of a type that is tamper proof. After the tests, it is recommended that the performance of the system is logged in the fire safety logbook. Automatic testing If the costs of an engineer’s time and the disruption caused by manual testing are excessive, self-testing emergency lighting should be considered. Different formats are available to match particular site requirements. However, the results of the monthly and annual tests must still be recorded.
  • General info about emergency lighting testing
    BS EN 50172 / BS 5266-8 (Emergency escape lighting systems) specify the minimum provision and testing of emergency lighting for different premises. Additional information on servicing can be found in BS 5266-1: (Code of practice for the emergency lighting of premises). Discharge tests need to be undertaken outside normal working hours. In buildings that are permanently occupied, the test should be phased so only alternate luminaires are tested. Regular servicing is essential. The occupier / owner of the premises shall appoint a competent person to supervise servicing of the system. This person shall be given sufficient authority to ensure the carrying out of any work necessary to maintain the system in correct operational mode. Because of the possibility of a failure of the normal lighting supply occurring shortly after a period of testing of the emergency lighting system or during the subsequent recharge period, all full duration tests shall, wherever possible, be undertaken just before a time of low risk to allow for battery recharge. Alternatively, suitable temporary arrangements shall be made until the batteries have been recharged. The following minimum inspections and tests shall be carried out at the intervals recommended below. The regulating authority may require specific tests. Daily emergency lighting inspection (only for central back-up systems) This check only applies to emergency lighting systems with a central back-up battery system. In this case, there is a daily visual inspection of indicators on the central power supply to identify that the system is operational. No test of operation is required. This test does not apply to emergency lighting with self-contained back-up batteries in each unit (standard emergency lighting). Monthly emergency lighting tests All emergency lighting systems must be tested monthly. The test is a short functional test in accordance with BS EN 50172 / BS 5266-8. The period of simulated failure should be sufficient for the purpose of this test while minimising damage to the system components, e.g., lamps. During this period, all luminaires and signs shall be checked to ensure that they are present, clean, and functioning correctly. Annual emergency lighting tests A test for the full rated duration of the emergency lights (e.g., 3 hours) must be carried out. The emergency lights must still be working at the end of this test. The result of the monthly and annual tests must be recorded and, if failures are detected, these must be remedied as soon as possible. It is common for fire alarm servicing companies to carry out the annual emergency light ‘drain’ test at the same time as they carry out fire alarm system maintenance, as this fills the waiting time of the ‘drain’ test with useful activity. British and European Standards – Emergency Lighting Emergency lighting is now covered by a series of interdependent standards that can be seen as forming a hierarchy as shown below. Base guidance document BS 5266-1 Code of practice for emergency lighting of premises. Gives general rules and guidance on the provision and operation of emergency lighting in most premises other than dwelling houses. System standards BS EN 1838 Lighting applications – emergency lighting. Specifies the illumination to be provided by emergency lighting (including luminance, duration, and colour). BS EN 50172 / BS 5266-8 Emergency escape lighting systems. Specifies the minimum provision and testing of emergency lighting for different premises. Product standards BS EN 60598-1 Luminaires. General requirements and tests. See the 60598 series for particular requirements. BS EN 62034 Automatic test systems for battery powered emergency escape lighting. Specifies a test system for battery powered emergency lighting. BS EN 50171 Central power supply systems. Specifies central power supply systems for emergency lighting luminaries. The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 The HM Government entry level guides to the RRFSO for different types of non-domestic premises and the communal areas in HMOs each have a section entitled “Further guidance.
  • Preparing For the Visit
    If you decide to go ahead with an emergency lighting test and inspection, there are a few ways you can help by preparing before an electrician arrives. Your electrician may need to turn the lighting off in certain areas to assess where the emergency lighting is situated if it is not clearly marked or identified on an existing site plan. Please get in contact with us if you think you will need some additional battery powered lighting whilst we carry out the test as some areas may be dark if the standard lighting is affected when carrying out the test. Your electrician will need access to your distribution boards and all Test Key Switches. If it’s our first time visiting you, we may need guidance from someone that is familiar with the building to point out the location of the distribution boards and test key switches. Your electrician will need access to any existing site plans and test logs so please have these readily available if you have any existing records.
  • How Long Will It Take?
    This can vary depending on the size of the building however as a guide we would usually expect to complete the test and inspection within 4 Hours for 1-50 Light Fittings and Up to 8 Hours for 51-100 Light Fittings.
  • What Will the Check Tell Me?
    The electrician carrying out your emergency light testing will produce a report/log and certificate to show that the emergency lights have been inspected and tested. The Log will also show any deviations from the current regulations or faulty equipment that may need replacing or repairing.
  • How Do I Book a Visit?
    Once you’re happy to proceed with your Emergency Light Testing, please contact us on 0114 242 2939 or visit our website www.mhoweelectrical.co.uk where you can select your time and date easily and check out through our online platform. If you have any questions, please call us on 0114 242 2939 or email us today: info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk
  • What Happens Next?
    Once you have placed your order with us either online or over the phone, we will give you a fixed time slot for the Emergency Light Testing to be carried out. This is usually a 4 or 8-Hour slot however some larger properties/Installations may take longer. Upon completion of the test and inspection our engineers will complete the certification using online software. They will also complete a quotation form for any observations noted enabling us to provide you with a fixed price quotation for any repairs that may be required. Please allow up to 5 Working Days from the completion of your inspection for our engineer and qualified NICEIC supervisor to complete your certification and subsequent quotation should there be any observations found.
  • Preparing For the Visit
    If you decide to get the Fire Alarm Testing carried out, there are a few ways you can help by preparing before an electrician arrives. Your electrician will need access to your fire alarm panel and access to all detectors on the system. If it’s our first time visiting you, we may need guidance from someone that is familiar with the building to point out anything unique to your system or to gain access into any locked rooms where detectors may be present. Your electrician will need access to any existing site plans and test logs so please have these readily available if you have any existing records. Please make staff aware that the testing is due to take place to avoid any false evacuations. If your system Is a monitored system, please make sure the responsible person or external monitoring company has been notified that the testing is taking place.
  • How Long Will It Take?
    This can vary significantly depending on the number and type of detectors however as a guide we would usually expect to complete installations up to 60 Detectors within 4-6 Hours.
  • What Will the Check Tell Me?
    Your fire alarm system has been installed to protect you and you’re building. Everyone depends on this system functioning properly in the event of a fire, acting as an early warning system, and enabling safe and timely evacuation. You have a legal obligation to ensure that this detection system is in good working order and adheres to current regulatory standards. M Howe Electrical Services will make servicing your fire alarm panel an effortless legal obligation for you. Our trained engineers will carry out you’re servicing in accordance with BS5839-1 and offer you a cost-effective way to ensure your sounders will activate if needed, giving you peace of mind. Your Inspection and Test will tell you if your system is functioning correctly or if there are any observations made, we will provide you with a quotation for any recommended repairs. We can provide you with routine bi-annual alarm testing & servicing and offer an emergency 24-hour response call-out service.
  • How Do I Book a Visit?
    Once you’re happy to proceed with your Fire Alarm Testing, please contact us on 0114 242 2939 or visit our website www.mhoweelectrical.co.uk where you can select your time and date easily and check out through our online platform. If you have any questions, please call us on 0114 242 2939 or email us today: info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk
  • What Happens Next?
    Once you have placed your order with us either online or over the phone, we will give you a fixed time slot for the Fire Alarm Testing to be carried out. This is usually a 4,6 or 8-Hour slot however some larger properties/Installations may take longer. Upon completion of the test and inspection our engineers will complete the certification using online software. They will also complete a quotation form for any observations noted enabling us to provide you with a fixed price quotation for any repairs that may be required. Please allow up to 5 Working Days from the completion of your inspection for our engineer and qualified NICEIC supervisor to complete your certification and subsequent quotation should there be any observations found.
  • What is PAT Testing?
    From desktop computers in offices to power drills on construction sites, almost every workplace depends on electricity to function efficiently. Electrical equipment is for most of the time utterly safe to use, however they still pose a risk for electrocutions and electrical shock injuries. Roughly 1000 electrical injuries in the workplace are recorded in the UK every year. Sadly, approximately 30 of these are fatal. According to the Health and Safety Executive, the most common cause of the accidents is direct contact with an electrical charge, including poorly maintained equipment, specifically portable electrical tools. For this reason, many businesses have their electrical appliances and equipment undergo regular portable appliance testing commonly referred to as (PAT Testing). You’ve probably heard the term several times but are not sure 100% what it means. Here, we are going to discuss PAT in detail.
  • What Does PAT Stand For?
    PAT stands for Portable Appliance Testing. It is a routine inspection conducted on electrical appliances and equipment to make sure they can be used safely in the workplace and any other public environments. PAT usually involves visual and electrical inspections. The visual inspection searches for visible signs of damage, such as cracks, dents, discolorations, scorch marks, and wear. Electrical testing utilizes specialized PAT devices to detect some types of defects. The procedure includes earth resistance, earth continuity, and insulation resistance tests, as well as polarity and safety-switch checks. There is a common misconception that all electrical items should undergo a full PAT test. Some appliances are subject to a thorough check, while others only need a simple visual inspection. The two factors that determine if an item should be PAT inspected are category and class. Category groups the items based on their type: stationary appliances, fixed appliances, moveable appliances, T appliances, etc. Class sorts them according to their risk level, with class one being the most dangerous and three the least threatening. Class one items need a full PAT inspection because they have low insulation and rely on earth for protection. The group typically includes photocopiers, industrial machinery, freezers, toasters, irons, laptop cables, vending machines, desktop computers, and microwaves. Class two appliances, such as lamps, televisions, and lawnmowers, are safer because they are double insulated and need an insulation test. Low voltage appliances such as laptops, torches, and cameras fall under class three and are considered the safest.
  • Why Do PAT Testing?
    The principal purpose of PAT Testing is to ensure that electrical appliances are safe to use, thus minimizing if not entirely preventing accidents and injuries in the workplace. Exposed wiring and loose connections can cause severe harm, and in rare cases, lead to death. Unchecked electrical issues are also a fire risk, which endangers not only the employees but also the entire business. The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 states that employers are responsible for the safety and well-being of their employees in the workplace. Businesses are also accountable for any customer or visitor who might be on the site. Furthermore, the Electricity at work Regulations 1989 requires all companies to inspect their electrical appliances and equipment regularly to ensure that they are safe to use. Failure to comply with the legislation can lead to severe penalties. PAT in itself is not a legal obligation. However, it is one of the most efficient and trusted methods of checking the safety of electrical appliances and equipment in the workplace and other environments. As a result, PAT has become the standard means of complying with the legal requirements in the UK. Lastly, many insurance firms require businesses to complete regular PAT inspections. Conducting PAT to maintain high levels of safety in the workplace will make the insurance company view the business favourably.
  • Where Does PAT Testing Apply?
    Technically, all organizations that use electrical appliances in their place of work are required to undergo PAT testing, from private companies to health clubs and universities. Businesses are labelled as high, medium, or low risk based on three factors, the risk level of the environment, the type of equipment used, and who uses them. Shops, hotels, schools, and offices, in general, have a low-risk level because electrical items here often stay in only one place and so are unlikely to be damaged. Hospitals, night clubs, beauty salons, and industrial buildings, such as factories and commercial kitchens, pose a medium risk as these are fast-paced places with a variety of appliances and equipment. Examples of high-risk environments are gyms, arcades, and other high traffic areas where the public can freely use the available electrical equipment. Construction sites, with their frequently chaotic pace and rampant use of hand-held tools, are very high risk. Businesses that offer accommodation, including holiday rentals, flats, and even boats, also need to comply with the requirement, especially if they have class one appliances such as kettles, microwaves, and washing machines. Although the legislation does not define the frequency of PAT tests, the rules state that the level of precaution taken should be equal to the hazard level of the place. High-risk environments should have more testing. The HSE also recommends additional factors to consider in determining how often the items should undergo PAT check. These are the age of the equipment, frequency of use, foreseen misuse of the equipment, effects on any repairs, and manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Who Can Do PAT Testing?
    The legislation did not mention who should conduct the PAT test or what qualifications the person has, only that he or she be competent. The Institution of Electrical Engineers defines a competent person as having adequate knowledge of electricity and sufficient electrical work experience. Additionally, he or she should know how to perform a visual inspection, understand the precautions to take, and recognize whether it is safe for the test to continue. Many companies and businesses designate one of their employees to undergo PAT training, as the course does not entail any requisite electrical credentials. Indeed, anyone who has completed a thorough PAT Testing training course can be a PAT tester. Here at M Howe Electrical Services however, we take away the responsibility for you. With our highly trained in-house engineers and network of vetted sub-contractors we will conduct your PAT Testing to a high standard, carry out repairs where possible and provide a bespoke ongoing maintenance package for all our support or new customers.
  • Preparing For the Visit
    If you decide to get the Portable Appliance Testing carried out, there are a few ways you can help by preparing before an electrician arrives. Your electrician may need to turn the power off and will need to unplug before working on the appliance. Therefore, you won’t be able to use any electrical gadgets whilst the work takes place. Your electrician will need access to anything your having PAT Tested including the sometimes-forgotten appliances or gadgets that have been stored away in a cupboard or drawer. Therefore, please clear the areas where they will need to work before they arrive and dig out where you can anything you would like PAT Testing. Unplug as many appliances as possible including your TV and Fridge. Remember, it is your responsibility to plug them back in after the electrics have been tested.
  • How Long Will It Take?
    This can vary significantly depending on the number and type of Items however as a guide we would usually expect to carry out around 160 Items a day on average per engineer.
  • What Will the Check Tell Me?
    The electrician carrying out your portable appliance testing will produce a report/log and certificate to show that the appliances have been inspected and tested along with a Re-Test Date. The Log will also show any defects or faulty equipment that may need taking out of service and will also give you a full log of the equipment that has been inspected and tested. This report identifies any damage, deterioration, defects, or conditions which may be dangerous. It determines if the electrics comply with the current British Standard for electrical safety. Finally, it will also include recommendations for improvements. The purpose of a report is to determine whether the appliances and equipment is safe to continue using.
  • How You Can Make Your Electrics Safer
    There are many things you can do to make your home or business safer. These include: Making sure any bulbs are the correct wattage for the fitting on lamps or lights. Ensuring any portable heaters are stable and at least 90cm away from curtains and other combustible materials. Checking the leads on your kettle, iron, and other portable appliances to make sure they haven’t frayed. Checking that only the outer sheath of cables is showing on plugs. Wherever possible, unplugging appliances if not in use or turning lights and appliances off. This saves wear and tear of your equipment. Making sure that appliance leads don’t come into contact with hot or wet surfaces at any time.
  • How Do I Book a Visit?
    Once you’re happy to proceed with your Portable Appliance Testing, please contact us on 0114 242 2939 or visit our website www.mhoweelectrical.co.uk where you can select your time and date easily and check out through our online platform. If you would like any more information, contact us on our Live Chat feature on our website, or give us a call on 0114 242 2939. You can even send us a message on What’s App 07769675753 or send us an email: info@mhoweelectrical.co.uk
  • What Happens Next?
    Once you have placed your order with us either online or over the phone, we will give you a fixed time slot for the PAT Testing to be carried out. This is usually a 2,4 or 8-Hour slot however some larger properties/Installations may take longer. Upon completion of the test and inspection our engineers will complete the certification using online software. They will also complete a quotation form for any observations noted enabling us to provide you with a fixed price quotation for any repairs that may be required. Please allow up to 5 Working Days from the completion of your inspection for our engineer and qualified NICEIC supervisor to complete your certification and subsequent quotation should there be any observations found.

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